High Levels of Ozone in California and Moderate Levels of Ozone in Maryland

The AirNow Map image above shows moderate levels of ozone for the majority of Maryland (Yellow, 51-100).

 

The AirNow Tech graph shows that in a majority of the areas reached around 70 ppb.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows increased levels of sulfates across Maryland and much of the Eastern United States. In Maryland especially the max surface sulfate concentration can reach 18-32 ug/m**3 (in yellow). Sulfates and Ozone often have similar precursors that help for their formation such as increased car exhaust due to traffic.

The AirNow Map shows a very unhealthy level of ozone within San Bernadino, California (Purple, 201-300)

The AirNow Tech graph above shows that San Bernadino has ozone that is unhealthy for sensitive groups as the maximum of the readings reach 107 ppb.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows that there is an increased level of surface sulfate concentration in the Los Angeles/ San Bernadino (in green, 4-8 ug/m**3)

 

Increased Ozone in Michigan & Increased Level of Particulate Matter in the South of United States

The AirNow Map image above shows there is an increased level of ozone in Michigan. Over part of Michigan and Lake Michigan is an area that is unhealthy for sensitive groups (101-150, in Orange).

The AirNow Tech graph supports this as there is an increased level of Ozone with the max reaching around 80 ppb.

The AirNow Map image above shows an increased level of particulate matter in the Southern region of the United States.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows there is an increased level of Sulfate Surface Concentration in the same Southern region of the United States. In its maximum, the sulfate concentration reaches 18-32 ug/m**3.

Dust Traveling Across Atlantic & Fires Continue in Mexico

The NASA Worldview image above shows there is an increased concentration of AOD traveling from Africa to the tropical Atlantic across the Atlantic Ocean.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows there is an increased dust surface concentration over the Atlantic. There is a more increased concentration towards the Sahara Desert. The large portion of the dust surface concentration reaches 40-80 ug/m**3.

The Hazard Map image above shows that there is an increased level of smoke coming from Guerro Mexico. The Global Fire Watch says there 322 fire alarms.

The NASA Worldview image shows there is an increased level of AOD coming from the same region Mexico.

Fire in New Mexico & Dust Accumulation in India

The NASA Worldview image above shows that there is an increased amount of dust in the northern portion of India. This is highlighted in the red and green portion in the close to the top of the image.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above supports this claim as there is an increased level of dust surface in the northern portion of India. In the highest areas, the dust concentration reaches between 5120 to 10240 ug/m**3.

The AirNow Map image shows a moderate level of PM 10 (51-100 AQI) that may be caused by a fire. INCIWEB reports that there was a fire that started Isleta Pueblo on May 21st, 2020. As of this blog, the fire is 90 percent contained.

The Aerosol Watch image above supports this claim as there is an increased level of AOD in the same region of New Mexico as shown in the red circle.

Fires in Mexico and Dust in China

The NASA Worldview image above shows that there is a large amount of dust over China. This is highlighted by the green and red mass over China.

This claim is supported in the NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above. There are multiple red spots showing high levels of dust surface concentration (5120-10240 ug/m**3)

The Hazard Map image above shows there is an increased concentration of smoke over Mexico. This is shown by the red, yellow, and green concentrations.

The Aerosol Watch image supports this claim as there is an increased level of AOD in that region (highlighted in red). These concentrations are 1 AOD.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows there is an increased level of smoke surface concentration. This concentration reaches more than 512 ug/m**3 in some areas (in purple).

Increased Levels of Ozone in Los Angeles; Smoke coming from Belize

The AirNow Map image above shows an increased level of Ozone around the Los Angeles Area. The red spot signifies an unhealthy level of ozone (151-200). This is an increase from the 21st of May where the maximum level of ozone was 101-150 (orange).

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above supports this claim as there an increased level of surface sulfate concentration. This is highlighted by the green spot (4-8 ug/m**3) next to Los Angeles. Ozone and Surface sulfates often have the same sources (cars, power generation, and other industries.)

The Hazard Map image above shows that there is a high concentration of smoke coming from Belize (highlighted in red).

The NASA Worldview image above supports this claim as there is a dark red area following the same track of the smoke from the Hazard Map image.

Increased Levels of Ozone Over Lake Michigan and Lake Huron; Growing Mass of Dust over Sahara Desert

The AirNow Map image above shows that there is a moderate level of ozone (AQI between 51-100, in yellow) over Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.

NOAA Aerosol Watch image above that shows a greenish to a yellow hue of AOD over Lake Huron and Lake Michigan. The high AOD in this region is associated to smoke from seasonal fire activity was scattered across Minnesota, eastern and northern North Dakota, and the southern portions of Saskatchewan and Manitoba, with a number of the plumes merging to form a larger patch
of smoke.

 

The NASA Worldview image above shows a growing mass of dust over the Sahara Desert. The dark red and green mass is mostly concentrated over Algeria.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above supports this claim as there is an increased concentration of dust over Algeria. The center of the concentration reaches levels greater than 10240 ug/m**3 (in pink).

Increased Levels of Ozone Surrounding Los Angeles and Fires in Central Mexico

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows that there is a higher concentration of surface sulfate across the Los Angeles area. This concentration is in light blue (2-4 ug/m**3).

The AirNow Map image above that there is an orange level of ozone (Unhealthy level of Ozone, 101-150 ug/m**3). Ozone and surface sulfates have similar sources of creation such as man-pollution from cars, power generation, and other industries.

 

The Hazard Map image above shows that there are two large sources of smoke in Central Mexico. This is highlighted by the large red spots. These spots are over Guerrero and Chiapas.

The NASA Worldview image above supports this idea as the Aerosol Optical Depth is high in these regions as highlighted by the dark red on top of Central Mexico.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows an increased level of smoke surface concentration originating from the same areas as the two sources of smoke over Mexico. This is highlighted in dark purple showing concentration of the smoke reaching greater than 512 ug/m**3.

The NASA Worldview image above shows smoke originating over Guerrero, Mexico.

The NASA Worldview image above shows smoke originating over Chiapas, Mexico.

Fires in Midwest and Dust in China

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows that there is a high concentration of dust in upper China. The deep red shows that the concentration of dust in certain areas can lead from 5120-10240 ug/m**3.

The NASA Worldview Image above supports the idea of a high dust concentration of upper China and Mongolia. This dust may be in concurrence with the trend of Asian Dust in which during the Spring months, the wind picks up dust in from northern China and Mongolia and carries it across East Asia.

The picture above is an image from the GOES 16 satellite.  It shows that there were multiple fires found that started on March 5th. The AirNow Map below shows that these fires could have released smoke leading to a Moderate PM 2.5 level (51-100 ppb, in yellow) in the Midwest.

 

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol above supports this claim as there is a high concentration of surface smoke in the midwest with concentrations in the Midwest region reaching from 64-128 ug/m**3.

Fires in Central Africa

The NASA FireMap above shows that there is a large cluster of fires that cross across the forests located in Central Africa.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows that the main sources of smoke are located around the Democratic Republic of Congo. The concentration of smoke in the DRC reaches the range of 128-256 ug/m**3.

The NASA Worldview image above supports the idea of a large concentration of smoke above Central Africa. This is shown by the large concentration of AOD above Central Africa highlighted by the red cloud.