Increased Level of Smoke in Canada Traveling South

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows that there is an increased concentration of smoke from Canada drifting downward.

The AirNow Map image above also supports this claim as the AQI within the central United States has reached a moderate level (Yellow, 51-100).

The Canada Hotspot Map shows that there are multiple hot spots in the lower central region of Canada. These hotspots could be possible areas that the smoke is originating from.

Lidar/Ceilometer data from Konza Prarie, Kansas shows that this smoke has drifted southward above Kansas. There is a smoke concentration that is contained within the 2000-3000 km range.

Smoke Concentration from Western Wildfires moving Northward & Tropical Storms in the Gulf

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Produce image above heavy smoke concentration from wildfires originating in the Western region of the United States is taking a path upward towards Canada before drifting diagonally southward towards Kansas. Lidar/ceilometer observations show that there is a smoke that is contained between 0-4 km. In these sites, the air quality is decreased as shown by the Airnow Map image below. The PM 2.5 levels reach between a moderate and Unhealthy Level (51-200 AQI).

Ceilometer sites showing smoke aloft today:

INDIANAPOLIS, IN

KONZA PRAIRIE, KS

    

SQUAMISH, BC, CANADA

In the Atlantic, there are multiple storms that are strengthening. The National Hurricane Center image below shows that there are three storms growing in which from left to right; Beta, Teddy, and Wilfred. Teddy is currently already at hurricane strength while Beta and Wilfred are at Tropical Storm strength.

The NASA Worldview image below shows satellite imagery of the storms.

Smoke From Western Wildfires Continues to Stay Over Eastern U.S.

For the third day in a row, lidar/ceilometer observations continue to show smoke which originated from the western U.S. wildfires. The smoke is traveling at a height of around 3-4 km and is not impacting the surface air quality measurements. The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows a heavy smoke from the western wildfire has continued to travel over the eastern shore and well into the Atlantic Ocean.

Ceilometer sites showing smoke aloft today:

Arendtsville, PA (#PADEP)

Blacksburg, VA

Bristol, PA

City College of New York, NY

Essex, MD

Konza Prairie, KS

Moose Hill, NH

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

 

Hazy Skies in the Eastern U.S. due to Western U.S. Wildfire Smoke

Lidar/ceilometer observations from multiple sites continue to show the presence of the western U.S. wildfire smoke. Smoke is confined to heights at 3-10km and not impacting the surface air quality measurements, as the PM2.5 Air Quality Index (AQI) is Good and shown in the Airnow.gov Particulate Matter (PM) AQI animation below.

Ceilometer sites showing smoke aloft this morning:

Arendtsville, PA (#PADEP)

Bristol, PA

City College of New York, NY

Edgewood, MD

Essex, MD

Indianapolis, IN

Londonderry, NH

Philadelphia, PA

Providence, RI

Richmond, VA

UMBC (Catonsville, MD)

Washington DC

 

 

California Wildfire Smoke Captured by Ceilometer Network Stations

Smoke from the California wildfires is visible in the NOAA GOES-16 image below.

This smoke plume is confined at heights between 4-10 km, as shown in lidar/ceilometer timeseries, in multiple sites in the East Coast. The ceilometer network is a multi-agency effort with the participation of over 15 state air quality management agencies (and growing), U.S. EPA, NASA, Environment and Climate Change Canada, NOAA and academia (https://alg.umbc.edu/ceilometer-network) led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) Atmospheric Lidar Group. NOAA Cooperative Science Centers (Office of Education/Educational Partnership Program) are part of this initiative, in particular the Center of Earth Science Systems and Remote Sensing Technology (CESSRST, cessrst.org) and the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology (NCAS_M, ncas-m.org), which UMBC is a partner institution.

Washington DC Dept. of Energy and Environment

UMBC (Catonsville, MD)

Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Protection (Arendtsville, PA)

UMBC/PADEP (Bristol, PA)

Philadelphia Dept. of Public Health

Rhode Island Dept. of Environmental Management (Providence, RI)

New Hampshire Dept. of Environmental Services (Londonderry, NH)

Increased Smoke Concentration in Europe & Smoke from West Coast Fires Travels Across Pacific Ocean

The NASA Worldview image above shows an increased concentration of AODs above the western region of Europe. The concentration of AODs extends over the Atlantic Ocean.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above supports this claim as in blue is an increased concentration of smoke that extends over the Pacific Ocean. The max optical depth in the smoke concentration reaches .8 in that region.

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows a heavy concentration of smoke origination from the west coast of the United States and extending over the Pacific Ocean.

The NASA Worldview image above shows that over 900 thousand miles of the Pacific Ocean are covered in smoke. NASA reports that this year over 4.4 million acres have been burned on the west coast in 2020.

Increased Concentration of Dust in China & Increased Smoke Concentration in Eastern Region of the United States

The NASA Worldview image above shows an increased concentration of dust in China.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above supports this claim as there is an increased concentration of dust in the western region of China. The maximum concentration of dust reaches between 80-160 ug/m**3.

 

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows an increased concentration of smoke in the Eastern region of the United States.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above supports this claim as there is an increased smoke surface concentration on the eastern region of the United States. The maximum concentration of this smoke reaches between 64-128 ug/m**3.

The UMBC’s ceilometer shows smoke at the 2000 meter mark (circled in red) from 00 to 06:45 UTC. This smoke most likely is from the increased smoke concentration in the eastern region of the United States. It is possible to track smoke on UMBC’s Ceilometer Network in real-time here.

Smoke over Mid Atlantic and In Depth Look into Fires on the West Coast

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows a heavy smoke concentration across the West Coast of the United States.

The NOAA Aerosol Watch image above supports this claim as there is an increased concentration AOD in the western region of the United States.

The NRL/Monterey Aerosol image above shows a heavy smoke concentration above the western region above the United States. In multiple regions of the West Coast, the smoke surface concentration reaches above 512 ug/m**3.

The AirNow Map image above shows an increased concentration of particulate matter above certain regions of the West Coast. Parts of Oregon and California reach a Hazardous AQI (Maroon, 301-500).

The USA Today News video above shows images from wildfires in California, Oregon, and Washington. USA Today News also reports that these fires have burned over 2 million acres and is currently being supported by high winds, record heat, and dry air.


The smoke made its way today to the Mid-Atlantic states as shown the ceilometer aerosol backscatter time-series. The image above is from the ceilometer located at UMBC, showing smoke aloft over Baltimore. The image below is from the ceilometer located in Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA) showing smoke up to 6 km.

Increased Levels of Smoke in California & Increased Level of Ozone in Arizona

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows an increased concentration of smoke originating from the California region.

 

The NOAA Aerosol Watch image above supports this claim as there is an increased concentration of AODs that are also in a higher concentration in the Calfornia region. INCIWEB reports that in California are multiple wildfires that together have burned over one million acres of land.

The Youtube video published by the Hill shows the devastation created by one of these fires, more specifically the Creek Fire.

The NOAA Air Quality Map above shows an increased concentration of ozone above Arizona.

The CAMS image above supports this claim as there is an increased concentration of Nitrous Dioxide in the same region of Arizona. Nitrous Dioxide and Ozone share many of the same precursors meaning an increase in one often reflects an increase in the other.

Increased Levels of Smoke in Oregon and Kansas

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product shows that there is a heavy concentration of smoke in the Oregon region.

The NOAA Aerosol Watch image above shows an increased concentration of AODs in the same region. INCIWEB reports that in that region is the Lionshead Fire which has burned over 9000 acres of land and is currently only 31 percent contained.

 

The NOAA Hazard Mapping System Fire and Smoke Product image above shows a low concentration over the center of the United States crossing all the way to the Great Lakes.

The NOAA Aersol Watch image above shows an increased concentration across the United States in a similar manner as stated before.

The UMBC’s Atmospheric Lidar Group’s Ceilometer Network shows that there is an observed concentration of smoke crossing over Konza Kansas at around 2500 meters. The image above and other ceilometer images can be seen in realtime here.